Posts Tagged ‘healthy cells’

broccoli boon

Sunday, March 28th, 2010

broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables

At the risk of sounding like the proverbial broken record, consuming a lot of fruits, vegetables, lean protein sources, and eschewing most fats and sugars, are really wonderful, healthy choices.  But you knew that already, right?  True, sitting down to a plate full of broccoli and tofu doesn’t sound quite as exciting as a plate full of warm chocolate chip cookies, but broccoli and other cruciferous veggies might just make you live longer and can help fight certain diseases like cancer.

In a very recent clinical study, it was discovered that women who maintained a diet high in vegetables, fruits, and soy, had a 30% decrease in breast cancer incidence, and a 64% risk reduction for postmenopausal women with similar eating habits, compared with women who ate a lot of meat and starch.  Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kale, and bok choy, can be particularly protective and help the body fight free radical damage and oxidative stress.

If eating right sounds boring at best, try spicing things up.  Sauté a bushel of broccoli or some boy choy, mixed with low sodium soy sauce and hot pepper flakes.  It’s easy to add rich flavors without adding any fats to the vegetables.  Once you commit to healthier cooking and eating, you’ll be surprised how easy it is.

And after you’ve eaten all your veggies, have a cookie.  One cannot live on broccoli alone.

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For more information about breast cancer and other health concerns, take a look at our articles and health archives on our homepage at Solanova.com.

And don’t forget to follow us on twitter and fan us on facebook. Join the healthy conversation and let us know what health topics interest you!

Reference: http://www.vitasearch.com/get-clp-summary/38893, “A vegetable-fruit-soy dietary pattern protects against breast cancer among postmenopausal Singapore Chinese women,” Butler LM, Yu MC, et al, Am J Clin Nutr, 2010 Feb 24; [Epub ahead of print]. (Address: Department of Environmental Radiological Health Sciences Colorado State University Fort Collins CO, USA).

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Veggie Might!

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010

womanwithsalad

Do you love cruciferous vegetables?  Are you only truly satisfied when you have a heaping plate of broccoli or bok choy in front of you?  Do you dream of a field full of cauliflower?  Apparently you’re not alone.  It seems that vegetarians may have a leg up on the rest of us as far as overall health.

A recent study conducted on adolescents suggests that those who ate a vegetarian diet were far more likely than non-vegetarians to meet the Healthy People 2010 dietary objectives. They tended to eat less overall fat and saturated fats and, not surprisingly, consumed far more servings of vegetables and fruits compared with their carnivorous counterparts.  The adolescent vegetarians were also less likely to eat fast foods and to indulge in sodas and fruit drinks.

So what does this mean for the rest of us?  Even if you aren’t a vegetarian (or a teenager), you can still adopt some of these healthy habits.  Aim for 3 to 4 servings of vegetables a day.  It’s not as hard as it sounds.  Have a side salad with that sandwich at lunch, and at dinnertime, fill your plate three-quarters full with a variety of veggies, i.e. carrots, salad, squash, peas, asparagus, green beans, or whatever strikes your fancy.  Fill the other quarter of the plate with your protein source.  You will be surprised at how easy it is to embrace good eating patterns as long as you stick to a variety.  Aside from the health benefits, you should also discover a smaller waistline.

Grab a fistful of radishes and that sauté pan.  You are on your way to a healthier you.  And who knows? You might end up liking veggies as much as chocolate.  Okay-maybe almost as much!

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Having problems stomaching certain foods?  Take a look at our dynamic, digestive duo with probiotics.  And try our Omega-Gel® for a healthier immune system.

Reference: http://www.vitasearch.com/get-clp-summary/30680, “Adolescent Vegetarians: How Well Do Their Dietary Patterns Meet the Healthy People 2010 Objectives?” Perry CL, McGuire MT, et al, Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med, May 2002;156:431-437.

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Vive the french!

Thursday, January 28th, 2010

Solanova nutritional supplements with Resveratrol

The popular antioxidant Resveratrol can counteract the effects of a fatty diet?  Mais Oui!

Flaxy, buttery croissants, decadent sauces, crepe Suzette, and steak au poivre may all come to mind when we think about French cuisine.  The French have a reputation for eating what they want, smoking (which we do not condone), and drinking wine oftentimes with lunch and dinner.  So why is there a plethora of research stating that the French experience fewer instances of cardiovascular disease than say, we Americans?  It just doesn’t seem fair.

There have been many theories over the years as to why the French have been somewhat spared the unwanted effects of heart disease.  Perhaps part of the protection comes from wine, as has been suggested by countless research studies.  A powerful antioxidant found in red wine, Resveratrol, seems to have protective health properties.  Also worth noting is that the French tend to eat less than Americans.  They seem to choose quality over quantity, whereas we Americans (in truly American fashion) choose both!

A recent study explored supplementation with Resveratrol along with a high fat diet in mice and discovered that the mice that were fed a high fat diet and Resveratrol were just as healthy as mice fed a healthier/low fat diet without the Resveratrol.  A third group of mice that were simply fed a high fat/high calorie diet without Resveratrol experienced many more health problems overall than the other two groups.  And other research studies have concluded that high doses of Resveratrol can mimic some of the health benefits of caloric restriction in mice.

So there seems to be compelling evidence that this wonder antioxidant, Resveratrol, has all kinds of protective properties.  However, scientists are hypothesizing that it would take many, many glasses (or bottles!) of wine to truly reap the significant benefits of Resveratrol.  We carry a superb supplement called Rubi QNol® CoQ10 that is an amalgam of our highly absorbable Ubiquinol (the reduced form of CoQ10) plus 50 mgs of the antioxidant powerhouse Resveratrol (the equivalent of 100 glasses of wine).  Together they form a great team that fight free radical damage, boost the immune system, and can help protect the heart.

Yep, we’ll drink to that!

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Here is some more information about the power of antioxidants in our health archives. Enjoy and be healthy!

http://www.vitasearch.com/get-clp-summary/35927,

Reference: “Resveratrol improves health and survival of mice on a high-calorie diet,” Baur JA, Pearson KJ, et al, Nature, 2006; 444(7117): 337-42. (Address: Department of Pathology, Paul F. Glenn Laboratories for the Biological Mechanisms of Aging, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. E-mail: D.S. at david_sinclair@hms.harvard.edu or R.deC at deCaboRa@grc.nia.nih.gov ).

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The skinny on skin care

Tuesday, January 12th, 2010

grey haired woman thinking

With record breaking low temperatures around the country lately, old man winter can sure be ruthless on our skin!  Cranked up office and home heaters, coupled with dry, cold, and windy days can really take all of the protective moisture out of our skin.  But sometimes, when the going gets tough, the tough decide to invest in good moisturizers and quality supplements, derived from the best, natural ingredients.

For example, it is widely understood that omega-3 fatty acids are good for your immune system, but they are also great for your skin!  Foods like avocados, olive oil, nuts, and fish are all good sources of omega-3 and can help soothe irritated and inflamed skin while fighting the negative effects of free radical damage.

Evening Primrose Oil (or EPO) is known for its ability to help improve both PMS symptoms and some side effects of Menopause. It contains an omega-6 essential fatty acid called gamma-linolenic acid or (GLA), which can help maintain cholesterol levels to normal and can promote better circulation.  Our bodies convert Gamma-linolenic acid into a hormone-like substance called prostaglandin that promotes healthy skin.

If you are experiencing overly dry skin, it’s also a good idea to find a high quality moisturizer that can penetrate the deeper layers of the epidermis.  One great example is our anti-aging Derma-QGel day crème.  It is made from the powerful antioxidant CoQ10, and natural oils and extracts from avocados, almonds, jojoba, evening primrose, and aloe, to name a few.  This cream helps to diminish the appearance of wrinkles and fine lines and offers tremendous hydration while promoting cell renewal.

Bathe your skin with quality moisturizers, eat foods rich in Omega-3’s and be sure to take in Omega-6 essential fatty acids too.  These methods, in conjunction with drinking plenty of water and avoiding washing your face with drying soap, can greatly improve the texture and quality of your winter skin.  And old man winter can blow those harsh winds all he wants.  You’re protected, both inside and out.

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Would you like to read more about important antioxidant protection? Find information about Ubiquinol, omega-3 fatty acid, CoQ10 and more by looking at our health archives.  We have high quality, cold-pressed Evening Primrose Oil at a very special price.  And as always, we offer free shipping on everything.  Here’s to your health!

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Out with the bad, in with the healthy!

Monday, December 28th, 2009

new-years-calendar

As the year comes to a close, you may find you are promising yourself all kinds of ambitious results in the name of New Year’s resolutions.  For example, you decided you’ll get up at 5am every day and take a jog around your neighborhood for at least 45 minutes-even if it’s raining-and cold.  And you’re not a jogger.  You’ve also promised yourself you’d cut up all of your credit cards except one, and then commit to paying it off in full every month.  Another resolution might be to not eat too much at one sitting and to be sure you consume at least three or four servings of vegetables and fruits a day.  Now all that doesn’t sound too hard, does it?

All of these New Year’s resolutions are very commendable, but the problem is that it can be very difficult and discouraging to try to live up to these types of ideals.  It’s great to think big and aim high but sometimes what we really need is a realistic goal that is actually attainable.  And once we’ve stuck to an easy and manageable plan, it gives us the confidence to perhaps add another healthy commitment to our plate.

Start with something simple.  If you’re trying to lose weight and consume a lot of sugary soda, try swapping the soda for water and watch as the pounds drop off.  Little adjustments like this can help over time, and it won’t make you feel hungry or too deprived.  Making plans to walk with a friend or family member after work a few times a week can help to lower your cholesterol and blood pressure, and also gives you time to catch up with the people you’d like to see more often-which is maybe another good New Year’s resolution to pursue.

Start with something fundamental.  If you smoke, by all means quit!  Sometimes, we skirt around the real health issue, such as making plans to exercise more and eat healthier when the first step should be to quit smoking.  But smoking cessation can be extremely challenging, and therefore committing to eating more broccoli instead sounds better.  But broccoli can only do so much if you are polluting your body with carcinogens.  Get into a program, find some support, and follow through on the one really important resolution for the year; kicking a bad health habit like smoking. And the bonus is that you not only make yourself healthier, but also help those around you.  Second hand smoke can cause a myriad of illnesses including asthma, so do your family and friends a favor and kick the habit for good.

Whatever resolutions you pick, make sure they mean something to you and are something you can work toward with confidence during the year.  May this season bring health and happiness to you and your loved ones.

Happy holidays!

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Read more about new years resolutions and what kind of healthy choices to make here. Commit to better health by taking powerful antioxidants and ensure a great 2010!

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Antioxidants to the rescue!

Thursday, December 3rd, 2009

Solanova Omega-Gel, Omega-3 fatty acid

Most of us are aware that antioxidants are good for us.  They help fortify our immune systems and protect us from free radicals that can cause cell damage.  Antioxidants are found in certain super foods like berries, salmon, whole grains, many vegetables and quality supplements.  There has been myriad research regarding the relationship between a healthy diet replete with antioxidants and certain diseases such as cancer and coronary artery disease (CAD).

In a study involving 42 patients (27 men, 15 women) with documented coronary artery disease (CAD) and 49 apparently healthy subjects (33 men, 16 women), patients with CAD were found to have significantly higher cellular DNA damage, quantified via TL, which was significantly higher in patients with CAD (87.3 microm), as compared to healthy controls (79.3 microm). In addition, levels of plasma TRAP, vitamin C, gamma-tocopherol, and alpha-carotene were lower in patients with CAD as compared to controls. Erythrocytic catalase activity, on the other hand, was increased in patients with CAD. The authors conclude, “…reduced overall antioxidant status was closely connected to higher susceptibility of DNA damage in CAD patients.”

It makes sense to protect yourself from potential diseases and other unwanted health conditions.  Grab a salmon salad, some omega-3 supplements and blueberries with frozen yogurt and start enjoying a life filled with healthy, powerful antioxidants!

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We have a lot of information about antioxidant protection.  Read all about antioxidant support in our health concerns archives!  And for unsurpassed Resveratrol health benefits, try our Rubi QNol® CoQ10 supplements with Ubiquinol.

http://www.vitasearch.com/get-clp-summary/38664

Reference: “Susceptibility to Oxidative Stress is Greater in Korean Patients with Coronary Artery Disease than Healthy Subjects,” Park E, Kyoung Park Y, et al, J Clin Biochem Nutr, 2009; 45(3): 341-6. (Address: Dept. of Food & Nutrition, Kyungnam University, Masan 631-701, Korea).

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Face to face with dry, winter skin

Tuesday, November 24th, 2009

happiness and solanova supplements are good for you

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It’s the time of year for holiday festivities, indulging in lots of yummy treats that are usually taboo, and enjoying the first snowfall.  But it’s also the time of year where the elements can be very hard your body’s largest organ, your skin.

Dry, cold, and windy weather can make our skin incredibly dry and not very pretty.  Because there’s nothing we can do about the changing seasons, we’d better come up with a dry skin strategy.

Keeping your body moisturized is the first thing to do.  When cold weather sets in, drinking cold water might not be uppermost in your mind.  A nice, large café latte sounds more enticing right?  That may be, but water is still incredibly important, especially if you’re downing those lattes (or hot toddy’s for that matter).  Try keeping a water pitcher on the counter, instead of in the fridge, that way at least the water you need to drink won’t be quite as chilly.

There are also foods that can help soothe dry, cracked skin.  Foods like low-fat yogurt, which is full of vitamin A and acidophilus, helps keep digestion normal and that can enhance your overall health and will reflect in your, improved, healthier looking skin too.  Blackberries, strawberries and blueberries are also excellent for your skin due to their high antioxidant content, which helps protect cells against free radical damage. And let’s not forget our friends omega-3 fatty acids found in foods like nuts, flax seeds and salmon, for example.  Omega-3 fatty acids help to maintain healthy cell membranes that can aid the skin in holding moisture.  Essential fatty acids, or EFA’s also mitigate inflammation in the body.

So grab a good moisturizer, your water bottle and make sure to integrate plenty of healthy foods into your diet this winter.  With a little effort, you can kick dry, scaly skin to the curb and welcome in a kinder, gentler, winter.

Happy Thanksgiving!

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Would you like to learn more about antioxidant protection? Read more here about antioxidant support and foods rich in antioxidants. We are having a huge sale on all our Coenzyme Q10 supplements and products that offer unsurpassed antioxidant support. Also try our Omega-3 supplement Omega-gel, and our luxurious moisturizer Derma Q-Gel day creme with Ubiquinol.

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An eye on your health

Wednesday, November 18th, 2009

solanova supplements to prevent eye disease

There are so many beautiful sights to see this time of year.  Leaves changing, bright, shiny holiday decorations strewn around lamp posts and in store windows.  And don’t forget the tempting Thanksgiving pies and other goodies lovingly placed on practically every table in the country.  But think if you couldn’t enjoy these cheery sights like the rest of us.  If your eyesight is going, enjoyable things like reading or going to a museum can become depressing.  But there is ongoing research that suggests better dedication to proper nutrition and antioxidant consumption can help mitigate the effects of certain eye problems.

In a study involving 828 healthy subjects between the ages of 20 and 60 years, various risk factors for age-related maculopathy were found to be associated with low dietary intakes of various antioxidants. The authors of this study set out to determine if the risk factors for age-related maculopathy, such as increasing age and tobacco use, and the putative risk factors, such as alcohol consumption and being of the female sex, were linked to a dietary lack of antioxidants that have been previously shown to benefit retinal health. The most significant finding was the association between increasing age and a relative lack of dietary zeaxanthin. Additional associations were found as well. Tobacco use was associated with a relative lack of dietary vitamin C, alcohol consumption was associated with a relative lack of dietary alpha-linoleic acid, and being of the female sex was associated with a relative lack of zinc. The authors state, “We showed that several variables related to risk of ARM are associated with a relative dietary lack of key nutrients, which may protect against this condition. Indeed, it is biologically plausible that the risk that these variables represent for ARM may reflect, at least in part, an associated and parallel dietary lack of key nutrients (e.g., age and dietary intake of zeaxanthin).” To determine the effects of zeaxanthin supplementation in such a population, additional research is needed.

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Want to read more about eye health?  Click here for our health concerns archives.  For unsurpassed antioxidant protection, try our Omega-Gel and Rubi-QNol supplements.

http://www.vitasearch.com/get-clp-summary/37193

Reference: “Diet and risk factors for age-related maculopathy, O’Connell ED, Nolan JM, et al, Am J Clin Nutr, 2008; 87(3): 712-22. (Address: Eamonn D. O’Connell, Department of Ophthalmology, Waterford Regional Hospital, Waterford, Ireland. E-mail: dreamonnoconnell@iolfree.ie ).

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It’s cold out there!

Monday, November 16th, 2009

yoga_sunset_300x450

It’s the time of year where we start to hunker down under blankets in front of the fireplace.  Instead of a glass of water or milk before bed, we might favor something warmer and more enticing like a steam mug of hot chocolate-with extra marshmallows of course.

And maybe all of a sudden, it doesn’t seem very appealing to run the track, take a hike through the local hills, or ride a bike on your trusty dirt trail.  It’s just too cold out!  So instead we become a bit more sedentary, venturing out to the gym only when it’s not raining or snowing.

Perhaps it’s somehow tied up with instinct.  After all, many animals hibernate during the cold months of the year.  They get to curl up in their dens, stuff themselves with food, and then sleep it all off for countless hours.  If only our lives could be that simple!  Unfortunately for we humans, we need to be a little more vigilant about our health habits.  It’s way too easy to put on extra pounds during the cold, holiday laden winter months, and very difficult to shed them.  Not to mention that extra weight can increase risk of diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and possibly some kinds of cancer.   Research studies have concluded that maintaining a normal weight can help reduce the risk for many diseases.

One surefire way to keep warm and motivated as you exercise during the cold months is to take a Bikram yoga class.  This style of yoga is practiced in a very warm room, so as to keep muscles limber, promote strength and to prevent injuries.  Other exercise classes can offer protection from the elements and usually a temperate workout environment too.  It’s also important to keep your immune system strong during the cold and flu season, which includes exercise, eating nutritious foods and taking vitamins and supplements to ensure you aren’t deficient.

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Read more about immune system strengthening in our Health Concerns archives.  We have many supplements that can fortify your immune system and help to keep you healthy all winter long.  Rubi QNol® CoQ10 offers unsurpassed antioxidant protection and MultiSential Plus multivitamin, a complete blend of essential vitamins, minerals and nutrients.

http://www.vitasearch.com/get-clp-summary/35039

Reference: “Midlife body mass index and hospitalization and mortality in older age,” Yan LL, Daviglus ML, et al, JAMA, 2006; 295(2): 190-8. (Address: Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Ill 60611, USA. E-Mail: lijing@northwestern.edu ).

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Vitamin D stands for "defense"

Tuesday, October 13th, 2009

field_sunset_400x386

We already know that vitamin D is crucial for calcium absorption and also may help to fortify the immune system.  Getting enough exercise, relaxing in (a little) sun once in a while and taking a quality vitamin D supplement can all be important aspects of good health.

Have you ever imagined why as soon as the season for colds begins, we tend to catch cold and influenza? This corresponds to less sunlight and thus vitamin D insufficiency.

A study was carried out originally to test the hypothesis that vitamin D supplementation would prevent bone loss in calcium-replete, African-American post-menopausal women. Half of 208 women were randomized to receive placebo or 800 IU/d of vitamin D for 1 year, followed by 2,000 IU/d for 2 years.

The incidence of symptoms of colds or influenza were determined at 6-month intervals by questioning. During 3 years, 26 subjects on placebo reported cold and influenza symptoms vs. 8 in the D group ( <0.002). The placebo group had symptoms mostly in winter, the 800 IU/d group had infrequent symptoms distributed evenly throughout the year, while only a single subject on 2,000 IU/d had symptoms, and this was in summer. For the high-dose group, some of the white bars in the figure appear to be missing, but that is because the number of sick subjects was zero. A biochemical rationale was proposed for this result

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Reference: http://www.vitasearch.com/get-clp-summary/38559Reduced prediagnostic 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in women with breast cancer: a nested case-control study,” Rejnmark L, Mosekilde L, et al, Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, 2009; 18(10): 2655-60. (Address: Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism C, Aarhus Sygehus, Aarhus University Hospital, Tage-Hansens Gade 2, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. E-mail: rejnmark@post6.tele.dk ).
Reference: Aloia JF, Li-Ng M. Correspondence. Epidemiol Infect 2007;12:1095-1096.


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