Archive for the ‘bone health’ Category

Put vitamin “d” in your diet!

Friday, November 5th, 2010

A new study shows that consumption of calcium and vitamin D while on a diet regimen, actually helps to facilitate further weight loss:

In a study involving an analysis of data collected from a 2-year trial involving 322 subjects (mean BMI: 31 kg/m(2), mean age: 52 years), of which 126 were followed for 6 months for serum vitamin D changes, higher dairy calcium intake and increased serum vitamin D were found to be associated with greater diet-induced weight loss. According to multivariate logistic regression modeling adjusted for age, sex, baseline BMI, total fat intake, diet group, vitamin D concentration, and dairy calcium, a 1 SD increase in dairy calcium intake increased the likelihood of weight loss >4.5 kg in the preceding 6 months (OR=1.45), and a similar increase was seen for serum 25(OH)D at 6 months as well (OR=1.7). The authors conclude, “Our study suggests that both higher dairy calcium intake and increased serum vitamin D are related to greater diet-induced weight loss.”

In addition, vitamin D & calcium can offer some protection against Osteoporosis and are thought to enhance the immune system.  So get plenty of exercise, eat a healthy, low fat diet, drink milk, and be sure to take a highly absorbable calcium/vitamin D nutritional supplement for stronger bones and better overall health.  Your bones, waistline and health will all thank you!

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Reference: http://www.vitasearch.com/get-clp-summary/39386, “Dairy calcium intake, serum vitamin D, and successful weight loss,” Shahar DR, Schwarzfuchs D, et al, Am J Clin Nutr, 2010 Nov; 92(5): 1017-22. (Address: S. Daniel Abraham Center for Health and Nutrition and the Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. E-mail: dshahar@bgu.ac.il ).

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ditching vitamin D proves detrimental

Friday, March 5th, 2010

Bone health with Liqui-calcium

On a recent trip to my dermatologist to freeze off some unsightly pre-cancerous spots, which is always a great time, I discovered something that I’ve long suspected.  As we chatted about the weather, vacation plans, and how often I still sunbathed (rarely), the dermatologist’s thoughts turned to vitamin D.  He asked me if I was taking a calcium supplement with vitamin D and when I replied enthusiastically in the affirmative, he was genuinely surprised.  “That’s great.”  He replied.  “You’re ahead of the curve.  Most people still don’t think about taking a supplement.”

The concept of vitamin D deficiency  makes perfect sense.  For most of us, we’ve heard from our various health care professionals that baking ourselves in the sun (even if you are dark skinned) for prolonged periods of time can result in sun-damaged skin, premature wrinkles, and in many cases, skin cancer.  As a result, most of us lather on sun block or moisturizers with sunscreen daily.  This is a good practice because it can really protect our skin from that insidious fireball in the sky, except for one thing.  We need to absorb some sunlight so that our bodies can manufacture vitamin D, which is essential to calcium absorption.

There has been so much research conducted lately about the positive effects of vitamin D on our immune systems and overall health.  Conversely, vitamin D deficiencies are now being examined closely as potentially contributing to various diseases such as cancer, obesity, and heart disease.  Even though much of this information is still being researched, one thing remains clear.  Calcium and vitamin D are essential for good health.  And most of us in the modern world either avoid the sun because of the aforementioned risks involved with worshipping it, or because the majority of us are sequestered in cubicles or offices, venturing out in the sunlight only long enough to procure a sandwich and a cup of coffee.

So I’m hedging my bets and taking a highly absorbable calcium supplement with 1000 IU vitamin D every day because I want to do all I can to lead a healthy life.  And also because I don’t want to see my dermatologist or his freezing apparatus for a very, very long time.

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Take a look at more information about stronger bones and optimal calcium absorption. We offer many excellent and highly absorbable supplements that support bone, immune system, and joint health.

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In vitamin D we trust

Friday, December 18th, 2009

couple happy with Solanova supplements

There has been a lot of discussion lately about the positive effects of getting enough vitamin D, and equally much lamenting that most Americans aren’t getting as much as they need of the important vitamin to live an optimally healthy life.  Through numerous research, it has been shown that people with low levels of vitamin D seem to have a higher risk of disease overall.  Vitamin D is traditionally known for its supporting role, helping calcium build up strong bones.  But it also can help to regulate and fortify the immune system.  In a very recent study, vitamin D deficiency was linked to a greater risk of developing dementia, Alzheimer disease, and stroke.

In a cross-sectional study involving 318 elders (mean age = 73.5 years) receiving home care, results indicate that vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency may be associated with increased risks for all-cause dementia, Alzheimer disease and stroke. 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were deficient (<10 ng/mL) in 14.5% and insufficient (10-20 ng/mL) in 44.3% of the participants. Mean 25(OH)D concentrations were found to be lower in subjects with dementia. Additionally, a significantly higher prevalence of dementia was observed in vitamin D insufficient subjects. After adjusting for confounding factors, vitamin D insufficiency was associated with more than a two-fold increased risk of dementia, Alzheimer disease and stroke (with and without dementia symptoms). Lastly, vitamin D deficiency was associated with increased white matter hyperintensity volume, grade, and prevalence of large vessel infarcts. Thus, the authors of this study conclude, “Vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency was associated with all-cause dementia, Alzheimer disease, stroke (with and without dementia symptoms), and MRI indicators of cerebrovascular disease. These findings suggest a potential vasculoprotective role of vitamin D.”

Vitamin D is turning out to be an incredibly important element for overall health.  Spending (a little) time in the sun, eating a balanced diet replete with calcium rich foods, and taking a quality vitamin D supplement can all contribute to continued good health and vitality.

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There is more information about enhancing the immune system and vitamin deficiency in our health concerns archives. And for superb antioxidant protection try our powerful Omega-Gel® supplements and our Liqui-Calcium for superior vitamin D support.

http://www.vitasearch.com/get-clp-summary/38665


Reference: “25-Hydroxyvitamin D, dementia, and cerebrovascular pathology in elders receiving home services,” Buell JS, Tucker KL, et al, Neurology, 2009 Nov 25; [Epub ahead of print]. (Address: Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA).

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Vitamin D stands for "defense"

Tuesday, October 13th, 2009

field_sunset_400x386

We already know that vitamin D is crucial for calcium absorption and also may help to fortify the immune system.  Getting enough exercise, relaxing in (a little) sun once in a while and taking a quality vitamin D supplement can all be important aspects of good health.

Have you ever imagined why as soon as the season for colds begins, we tend to catch cold and influenza? This corresponds to less sunlight and thus vitamin D insufficiency.

A study was carried out originally to test the hypothesis that vitamin D supplementation would prevent bone loss in calcium-replete, African-American post-menopausal women. Half of 208 women were randomized to receive placebo or 800 IU/d of vitamin D for 1 year, followed by 2,000 IU/d for 2 years.

The incidence of symptoms of colds or influenza were determined at 6-month intervals by questioning. During 3 years, 26 subjects on placebo reported cold and influenza symptoms vs. 8 in the D group ( <0.002). The placebo group had symptoms mostly in winter, the 800 IU/d group had infrequent symptoms distributed evenly throughout the year, while only a single subject on 2,000 IU/d had symptoms, and this was in summer. For the high-dose group, some of the white bars in the figure appear to be missing, but that is because the number of sick subjects was zero. A biochemical rationale was proposed for this result

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Reference: http://www.vitasearch.com/get-clp-summary/38559Reduced prediagnostic 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in women with breast cancer: a nested case-control study,” Rejnmark L, Mosekilde L, et al, Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, 2009; 18(10): 2655-60. (Address: Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism C, Aarhus Sygehus, Aarhus University Hospital, Tage-Hansens Gade 2, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. E-mail: rejnmark@post6.tele.dk ).
Reference: Aloia JF, Li-Ng M. Correspondence. Epidemiol Infect 2007;12:1095-1096.


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Vitamin D deserves an "A"

Friday, October 9th, 2009

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Lately vitamin D seems to be the rediscovered and indispensable vitamin of the moment.  And with good reason.  There is ongoing research examining the potential benefits of incorporating more vitamin D into a supplement routine in order to fortify our immune systems .

So spend a little time in the sun and don’t forget to include a calcium nutritional supplement replete with vitamin D.

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Here’s more information about calcium, strong bones and how vitamin D affects our health.  Try our new Liqui-Calcium now with 1000 IU of vitamin D3 for unsurpassed absorption and efficacy.

Reference: http://www.vitasearch.com/get-clp-summary/38546

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Invest in your health

Friday, September 18th, 2009

invest_health_500x333

Unless you’ve been living out in the sand dunes of the Gobi desert in Mongolia-and perhaps even then-you’ve heard about the possibility of a bad flu season this year.

It never ceases to amaze me how much we are willing to pay for a designer sweater, a fancy meal out, or the next hot tech gadget we don’t really need.  But when it comes to our health, we often scoff at the idea of a minimal financial investment.

Do we not realize that without our good health, we wouldn’t be going out, donning that new sweater, playing on that new gadget in the fancy restaurant?  It’s high time we got our priorities straight.

And it’s not so difficult.  Getting moderate daily exercise, monitoring your weight and fat intake, and investing in good quality vitamins and nutritional supplements can make all the difference to your health.  And this flu season, we need all the help we can get to fortify our immune systems.

Lately there has been much research concluding the health significance of getting and absorbing enough vitamin D.  In fact, some preliminary studies seem to indicate that vitamin D could possibly play an especially important role in thwarting-or lessening the effects of-the H1N1 virus.  Stay tuned for more information regarding this connection.

Vitamin D has also been shown to benefit heart patients.  A recent study hypothesizes that heart patients who had low vitamin D levels could have adversely affected cardiac function.  The study therefore suggests that supplementing with vitamin D could benefit heart failure patient’s treatment.

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Would you like to read more about the health effects of vitamin D?  Check out our health library here.  Some other products for good immune system support are MultiSential Plus, and Omega-Gel®.  Remember to make an investment in your health today and collect the dividends for a lifetime.

http://www.vitasearch.com/get-clp-summary/38457

Reference: “Calcium and Vitamin D Status in Heart Failure Patients in Isfahan, Iran,” Garakyaraghi M, Kerdegari M, Siavash M, Biol Trace Elem Res, 2009 Aug 19; [Epub ahead of print]. (Address: Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center, Isfahan, Iran).

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Milk Dud

Thursday, June 25th, 2009

I have a bone to pick.  I’m a person who doesn’t care for milk.  I know it’s wrong. I know I should just get over it, plug my nose and drink it anyway while embracing milk’s clever little ad campaigns.  But I just can’t.  And lately I’ve been a little concerned about the health of my bones as a result of my aversion to frosty cold cow juice.  So I decided to figure out what my alternatives are, if I choose to stay on the milk-free wagon.

Solanova bone health liqui-calciumOld bone is replaced by new bone everyday.  But as we age, our bodies lose their ability to regenerate new bone at the same rate, therefore leaving us vulnerable to fractures and other complications.  This is not great news for we non-milk imbibers.  Oftentimes bone mass loss isn’t detected until the problem is already severe, so it’s important to consume (and absorb) as much calcium as you possibly can.

So what foods (besides milk) are high in calcium?  Turns out not only are cheese and yogurt full of calcium, but also non-dairy foods such as collard greens, spinach, nuts, and even papaya are relatively high in calcium.  I have to report, however, that milk really is one of the best sources of calcium.  Sigh. Lucky for me there are plenty of quality calcium supplements that I can take anytime and they taste nothing like cow udder.  Hurrah!

Lastly, for good bone health, in addition to taking calcium (in some form) every day, it would behoove me (and you too) to join the gym rats and pump some iron.  Weight training is excellent for maintaining strong bones-and it doesn’t hurt your physique either!  So maybe I can actually fulfill my body’s calcium need by taking great supplements, eating mounds of collared greens and spinach, and sporting a requisite weight-training belt.

And if all else fails, I guess I can force down a chocolate milkshake once in awhile.  One has to sacrifice for one’s health sometimes.

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Read more about bone health and how to maintain good, strong bones throughout your life here.  Some of our products that help to enhance bone health are Liqui-Calcium, that supplies high levels of calcium absorption, Super Glucosamine that supports joint and cartilage health, and MultiSential Plus for full-spectrum multi-vitamin nutrition.  No bones about it!

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Let the Sunshine in

Tuesday, June 9th, 2009

Sunshine brings Vitamin D

You know that big, scary, powerful, orange fireball in the sky?  No? You mean you’ve been hiding from it for the last, say, twenty years?  Much like eggs and the cholesterol battle, our poor, neglected sun has been getting a bad rap lately.  That’s not to say you should go old school, break out the bathing suit and slather yourself with baby oil, but it turns out that a little- i.e. 15 minutes-of unprotected sun exposure 3 times a week can be good for you.  Yes, good for you.

There’s a good reason we have a sun smiling down on us (and who could afford the heating bill otherwise?).  We are running a vitamin D deficit; some studies show that overall we get 50% less vitamin D absorption than we need for a healthy lifestyle.  Vitamin D is best known for aiding calcium absorption and building strong bones but is now thought to also help thwart certain types of cancer, heart disease and other chronic health conditions.  Taking a quality supplement can help with our shortage of this crucial vitamin.  And the sun wants to help us out too.  Vitamin D is so vital to our health that our bodies manufacture it automatically, but only after our skin has been exposed to ample sunlight.

So toss off that oversized hat and leave the sun block at home-for a few minutes anyway.  It’s time to catch some rays, literally.  And be sure to take your vitamins too.  After all, they’re good for you and will help you have a happy and healthy summer.

Enjoy!

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Want to read more about vitamin D and calcium?  Check out our health library for more information.  Besides a healthy serving of sunshine, we offer several nutritional supplements that can aid vitamin D absorption and supplementation.  Liqui-Calcium is a high-powered amalgam of six essential sources of calcium which includes vitamin D and other minerals.  And our renown multi vitamin, MultiSential Plus, boasts a complete blend of vitamins and minerals including 600 IU’s of vitamin D.

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